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Old Sep 29th 2017, 09:04 AM   #1
mottman
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Density of sucrose solution

How do I calculate the density (g/ml) of a sucrose solution if the concentration of the sucrose (g/L) in the solution is known? I can solve this problem if I know the concentration of sucrose on a wt/wt basis (g/g). For example, if the density of a sucrose solution is 150 g/kg, in 1 kg of this solution there would 150 g of sugar and 850 g of water. The volume of 150 g of sugar would be 150 g / density of sucrose (1.587 g/ml) = 94.5 ml. The volume of water would be 850 g/ density of water (1 g/ml) = 850 ml. The volume of a 1000 g solution would be 850 ml + 94.5 ml = 944.5 ml. The density of the solution would be 1000 g/ 944.5 ml = 1.059 g/ml which agrees closely with table values. Where I am stuck is calculating how many grams of sucrose would be in 1 kg of solution and having density of sucrose in terms of g/ml since the units do not seem to cancel properly. Thanks.

Last edited by mottman; Sep 29th 2017 at 05:24 PM.
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