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Old Feb 16th 2017, 08:20 AM   #1
Randaru
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Question Constant volume combustion

I am in the process of designing a new engine and would like to get a ball park estimate of the combustion process before building the first prototype. One of the design features of the engine is true constant volume combustion. From the limited research I have performed, it seems most assume combustion products to be close to an ideal gas. I have no chemistry background and get the feeling that the question I am asking is somewhat advanced so I am not sure that any of the equations I would choose, such as PV=nRt would be valid.

Here are my two questions:

1- Given an insulated 8 cubic inch volume cylinder filled with a stoichiometric air\gasoline (87 octane) mix at a 10\1 compression ratio (10 atm) under constant volume conditions and normal ambient start conditions, what would be the maximum pressure and temperature of combustion given no heat loss or work to the environment?

2-Given no heat loss or work to the environment, what would be the final temperature and pressure of the gases of combustion in question 1 if the initial volume of 8 cubic inches was expanded to 32 cubic inches; to 64; to 128?

I have initially used the PV=NRT equation but realise this probably assumes too much. I don't know if this is a site that I can pay for answers but it is something I am willing to do because I believe this is an advanced chemistry problem that I am not able to put the time into right now.

Thanks for considering this,

Randy
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combustion, constant volume, max pressure, max temperature



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