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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:21 AM   #1
erich22
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the hybridization of SO2

Could anyone explain to me the hybridization of SO2, and the lewis structure for the SO2 bond?

Thank u very much!
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 03:41 PM   #2
TheMasterMind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erich22 View Post
Could anyone explain to me the hybridization of SO2, and the lewis structure for the SO2 bond?

Thank u very much!
First thing, before hybridization, i recommend drawing the Lewis structure. This can be done by counting up valence electrons:

S: 6 total
O: 12 total (6x2)

This gives us 18 electrons to work with. Place the central atom S bonded to the oxygen atoms. This satisfies both oxygen atoms but notice that the sulfur (central atom) is not satisfied. Therefore, a double bond must form in order to obtain stability and make the central atom happy.

You will get something like : O=S-O with a lone pair on the sulfur atom. This will give it a 'bent' shape. The hybridization of a molecule always includes lone pairs. Therefore, this molecule will be Sp^2 hybridized, since you have a single and double bond as well as a lone pair. In other words, an s and two p's.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 09:54 PM   #3
erich22
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Thank u for your answer Sir Mastermind.
I understand that there will be a double bond between 1 atom Oxygen and the Sulphur.

But I still don't get it, how can u conclude that there is a single bond between the other atom Oxygen and Sulphur.

I conclude that there maybe a double coordinate covalence bond between the other Oxygen and Sulphur.

But if it is just like I concluded, then I don't know why this molecule will be sp^2 hybridized.

Would u mind explaining it to me with a little more detailed?

N could u explain the hybridization from the orbital point of view of the Sulphur atom?

Thank u very much Sir!
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Old June 10th, 2010, 01:42 PM   #4
TheMasterMind
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Originally Posted by erich22 View Post
Thank u for your answer Sir Mastermind.
I understand that there will be a double bond between 1 atom Oxygen and the Sulphur.

But I still don't get it, how can u conclude that there is a single bond between the other atom Oxygen and Sulphur.

I conclude that there maybe a double coordinate covalence bond between the other Oxygen and Sulphur.

But if it is just like I concluded, then I don't know why this molecule will be sp^2 hybridized.

Would u mind explaining it to me with a little more detailed?

N could u explain the hybridization from the orbital point of view of the Sulphur atom?

Thank u very much Sir!
hello sorry for my late response i received your personal message but i have been very busy!

alright in regards to your concern about the double bond and the single bond. are you aware of the octet rule? each atom will obtain 8 valence electrons to be in the most stable form. now, with S you have only 6 valence electrons with two single bonds giving you 4 electrons plus 2 for the lone pair gives you 6 valence electrons. If you form a double bond, you have 8 electrons and the octet rule is obeyed (since you must have a pair or two electrons to form a bond). With two double bonds or two single bonds, this rule is avoided.

it is sp2 hybridized because you have a double bond( when looking at hybridization we do not look at the double bond! we avoid it and count it as if it was a single bond! ) now we have a lone pair ( which stated before IS included in hybridization ) and two single bonds so we have an s and two p's. thus sp2 hybridized.

if you still do not understand look at another example such as CH4 (methane)

there are four single bonds forming a tetrahedral arrangement with no lone pairs. so we have one s and 3 p's. thus it is sp3 hybridized.

i hope this made it more clear.
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