Chemistry naming oxyacids

Dec 2019
17
0
United States
Naming Oxyacids (oxyacids produce the H+ cation)
The first step in writing a name for a formula is to decide which type of compound it represents.
Second, determine the anion (the name of the acid is based on the anion attached to the hydrogen)
The acid name comes from the root name of the oxyanion name or the central element of the oxyanion.
Oxyanions are named according to the following rules:
If the group ends in the suffix -ate (with more oxygen atoms bonded), it changes to -ic
If the group ends in the suffix -ite(with less less oxygen atoms bonded), it changes to -ious

Is this the correct step process?B50B8DCA-56F2-4CD5-B794-3DFCC919F73F.jpeg
 
Apr 2015
35
8
Probably best to use an example.

An oxyacid is a compound that contains hydrogen, oxygen, and at least one other element, with at least one hydrogen atom bond to oxygen that can dissociate to produce the H+ cation and the anion of the acid.

So consider the one other element to be Chlorine.
The oxyacids of Chlorine are

Perchloric acid HClO4 yielding perchlorate salt or anion
Chloric acid HClO3 yielding chlorate salt or anion
Chlorous acid HClO2 yielding chlorite salt or anion
Hypochlorous acid HClO yielding hypochlorite salt or anion


Does this help?


Sorry this site has lost all the formatting.
 
Dec 2019
17
0
United States
Probably best to use an example.

An oxyacid is a compound that contains hydrogen, oxygen, and at least one other element, with at least one hydrogen atom bond to oxygen that can dissociate to produce the H+ cation and the anion of the acid.

So consider the one other element to be Chlorine.
The oxyacids of Chlorine are

Perchloric acid HClO4 yielding perchlorate salt or anion
Chloric acid HClO3 yielding chlorate salt or anion
Chlorous acid HClO2 yielding chlorite salt or anion
Hypochlorous acid HClO yielding hypochlorite salt or anion


Does this help?


Sorry this site has lost all the formatting.
But how do I write it out as steps from what I’ve explained above?
 
Apr 2015
35
8
Doesn't my example illustrate your 'steps' ?