Water hydrolysis

Jan 2020
3
0
Spain
I was doing some water (tap water) hydrolysis using sodium bicarbonate to increase conductivity. Both the cathode and the anode are made of zinc plsted steel screws, however a couple of them seemed to be chrome plated instead, yet I am not sure. The screws were held together by wood, the wiring was made out of copper.
A greenish brown precipitate has appeared and I would like to know what it is, but the the real issue is that the solution had turned cyan, somehow close to copper sulphate, but a little bit more greenish. It has even coated the copper wiring. Yet I don't think it's copper sulphate because I have not provided any source of sulfur.
 
Jan 2020
3
0
Spain
Update: I have tried with distilled water, and the color has also appeared, however the precipitate hasn't. Though I'm not sure if it is due to the distilled water, because the wiring has broken and the reaction has stopped too soon. The copper has dissolved, so I think that the copper is the source of the coloring compound. Copper acetate is the exact same color, but I doubt there was any source of acetate ions.
Another hypothesis is that copper peroxide provides the green color and a blue compound creates the ilusion of a greenish blue compound.
 
Jan 2020
3
0
Spain
Another update:

Don't worry guys, I think I have solved the problem, copper ions are dissolved into the solution, which causes them to react with water and sodium bicarbonate to form copper hydroxide and copper carbonate, which stay in suspension and give that color (it has been is suspension for 5 hours and it is still colored, but it seems more pale) . And for the solid stuff, I guess it's a mix of copper hydroxide and copper carbonate as they are both not soluble in water.